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: spelman college was in atlanta, and yet even though atlanta is seen certainly today as one of the less racist spots in the south, in fact, atlanta was almost totally segregated when howard arrived at pellman. by -- spelman. by the way, he never, he made sure that people never thought that he took a job at an all-black women's college because he was committed to the black struggle. we're talking about 1956 when the black struggle was just beginning. and though howard did care about black rights, he was not yet an activist in behalf of those rights. but in fairly short order, he and his wife roz both became very active. i mean, his students -- the first white women came a little bit after howard's arrival. and even then very few of them. and young black women, many of whom had been brought up in rural areas, they were slightly stunned at this white teacher. there were few other white members of the spelman fact facy faculty -- faculty. but howard was a genius of a teacher. he was very inform formal, very -- informal, very easy going. he prided himself on being good at conversation and on
was in atlanta and even though it is seen today as one of the less racist spots in the south, in effect atlanta was almost totally segregated when howard arrived at spellman, but by the way, she made sure that people never thought that he took a job at an all black women's college because he was committed to the black struggle. but it was just beginning and to know how word did care about black rights he wasn't in activist on behalf of those rights. in fairly short order she and his wife both became very active the first white women came a little bit our after his arrival and even then a very few of them young black women many of whom had been part of the rural areas, they were slightly stunned at this white teacher and there were fewer other members of this bill my faculty. but howard was a genius of a teacher. she was very informal, very easygoing fox, he prided himself on a conversation and entertaining other points of view. he didn't see himself as a lecturer. someone was handing down the truth to the enlarged. securely on created a very warm give-and-take in the classroom to get to the act
in the middle of a lot of civil-rights politics? >> guest: in atlanta, and even though atlantis is seen certainly today as one of the less racist spots in the son of, in fact it was almost totally segregated when he arrived. but, by the way, he made sure that people never thought that he took a job that an all-black women's college because he was committed to the black struggle. we're talking about 1956 when the black struggle was just beginning. and though howard did care about black rights, he was not yet an activist on behalf of those rights. but in fairly short order he and his wife became very active. i mean, his students, the first white women came of little bit after howard's arrival and even then very few. dion, black women, many of whom have been brought up in rural areas, they were slightly stunned at this white teacher. there were few other white members, but howard was a genius of -- teacher. very informal, very easygoing. he prided himself on being good at conversation and at entertaining other points of view. he did the see himself as a lecturer, someone who was handing do
? >> guest: there is many different. the papers of boston in the papers of atlanta and the papers in so many different places, hundreds of archives around the world. i found king papers in india. so you bring them all together and you decide how to publish them and make them available to people. that has been my job for the last 25 years. >> host: you are a historian and your african-american. i can see your interest. what really brought you to want to do this? coretta his wife, his widow asked you about what was her motivation for wanting to do at? >> guest: i think i didn't want to not do it. i think it was more -- i had a lot of doubts because i didn't know of wanted to devote the rest of my career to doing this. >> host: what did she say to you? how did she ask you? >> guest: she asked whether i would be interested in actually when we first talked on that phonecall i said aren't there other people who have done more were? my work was on the grassroots struggle and not so much on king's role. i never have really written much about king apart from the movement. so but then she came out and
? >> guest: the peepers i'm editing, the papers at boston, the peepers and atlanta, the papers and so many different places, hundreds of archives are none of the world. i've gone -- i have papers in india. so we bring them all together and we decide how to publish them and make them available to people. that's been my job for the last 25 years. >> host: ury history in coming your african-american. i can see an interest. what brought you to want to do this? coretta asked you but what was your motivation for wanting to do it? >> guest: i think i didn't want to not do it. i didn't know wanted to devote the rest of my career to do this. >> host: how did she ask? >> guest: she asked are you interested and when we first talked people that have done work really on the grassroots dimension of the struggle not so much on the role i never knew much about him apart from the movement. so, but then she came out and i remembered you're going to spend the rest of your career editing martin luther king's papers and you turned it down and i think she was a little bit wiser than i was at that point of recog
in atlanta, the papers and so many different places, hundreds of archives around the world. i found papers in india. we bring them all together and decide how to publish them and make them available to people. that's been my job for the last 25 years. >> host: do ra history and african-american, i can see your interest. what really brought you to want to do this? his wife asked you, but what was your motivation for wanting to do it? >> guest: i had a lot of doubts when she called and asked because i didn't know if i wanted to devote the rest of my career to doing this. >> host: how did she ask you? >> guest: she asked me if i would be interested in and when we first talked on that phone call i said are in their other people that have done more work really on the grassroots dimension of the struggle, not so much on the role. i've never really written very much about came apart from the movement. so, but then she came out and i remembered my wife and i do want to spend the rest of your career you could have been editor of the papers, but we turned it down, and i think she was a little bit wi
different? what did you find? >> guest: the papers i am taking, the papers of boston, the papers at atlanta, the papers of some at different places, hundreds of archives around the world. i've gone, i found papers in india. so you bring them all together and you decide how to publish them, make them available to people. that's been my job for the last 25 years. >> host: you've lived in this town. you're a history. you're african-american. can see your interest. what really brought you to want to do this? carranza, ma his wife, ask you, his widow, asked you what was your motivation for wanting to do it? i think i didn't want to not do it. i think it was more -- i had a lot of doubts when she called and asked because i didn't have the wanted to devote -- >> host: how did she ask? >> guest: she asked wha whetheri would be interested in actually when we first talked on the phone call i said on to other people done more work? my work and then really the grassroots of the struggle not so much on his role. i never had really been very much about him apart from the movement. but then she came out a
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7